Sri Lanka Slow Lories Quest

9 Comments
  1. PandaSmith 7 years ago

    Hey Tobi – I have no useful info but I am curious as to when you are going? We are thinking of going in December of 2013.

  2. Vladimir Dinets 7 years ago

    And I am going in August. I have a few tips that other people have shared. What’s your email?

    • PandaSmith 7 years ago

      Hey Vladimir – here is my email: naturetraveler@msn.com

      Much appreciated in advance for any info you can pass my way! Cheers. Coke

    • Jane Kyme 7 years ago

      Hi Vladimir. I am going to Sri Lanka on Friday hoping to see any mammals that are about. Any help would be gratefully accepted. If I have any luck I will share my findings if possible.
      Thanks

  3. Profile photo of tobbelu Author
    tobbelu 7 years ago

    hi vladimir
    and here is my address: torbjorn.lundqvist@yahoo.com. any tips is welcome!
    all the best
    tobi

  4. Profile photo of charleswhood
    charleswhood 7 years ago

    In March 2012 I did an ill-timed “full moon” trip to Sri Lanka that had a trip list of 48 mammals, 201 birds, 26 frogs and toads, and 6 snakes. I was limited by time in that I had to tie it to work in London over spring break and then get back to California to teach. It was a rushed 10 day trip straddling the full moon, but as the numbers verify, a British partner and I did all right. The trick was our guide, Uditha Hettige. He is the same one Jon has such good experiences with. My sense is that without expert guides (who can get into closed areas “after hours”) and who have staked out species on private land, a solo visitor could only end up getting half of those totals. To get the highest total of all (see previous trip reports), you have to decide to spend whatever it costs, to go at an optimal time (I edged up too close against the rainy season), and to have at least 2 full weeks available. Note too that Uditha is popular with the American bird tours (eg “Field Guides”) and so is booked up pretty far in advance. He’s the guy, though, if you want to nail it all. For felids, with his help, we had Rusty-spotted Cat, Fishing Cat, Leopard, and a hybrid Jungle Cat with some backcrossing of feral cat in its lineage. As the army expression goes, good luck and good hunting. / Charles Hood, Palmdale, California, hoodcw@gmail.com

  5. Profile photo of Jon Hall
    Jon Hall 7 years ago

    Just checking that all those asking questions here have seen the many mammal trip reports on http://mammalwatching.com/Oriental/orientsrilanka.html

    cheers

    Jon

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