Dunedin Farm Mammal Guide (Western Cape, South Africa) – 2021 update

Dunedin Farm Mammal Guide (Western Cape, South Africa) – 2021 update

In the last 6 years I have spent 13 nights (3 trips) at Dunedin Farm and I am still finding mammals new to me (e.g. Large-eared Mouse on my 13th night). My revised Mammal Guide (link here) includes updated maps and species lists (including taxonomic changes).

If you have visited then you might want to check the Sengi notes. In 2021 after reviewing the Sengi on Dam Hill and wondering if that was Karoo Rock Sengi (Elephantulus edwardii) I contacted Hanneline Smit-Robinson who described this species and she agrees. It does not have a large range. Marietha has also photographed Western Rock Sengi near the Dunedin farm-house; colour, eye-ring and habitat are different to those of the Karoo Rock Sengis we have seen.

Recent taxonomic changes include Genetta genetta (Small-spotted Genet) to Genetta feline; and Rhabdomys intermedius (Karoo Four-striped Mice) split from Rhabdomys pumilio.

The 2021 checklist also includes retractions e.g. Round-eared Sengi and Long-tailed Serotine. The Stuarts’ Field Guide refer to all sengi being almost entirely diurnal and only Round-eared Sengi as partly nocturnal; I have, however, seen Karoo Rock Sengi at 10.30 pm at Dunedin Farm; and at Marrick I have seen Eastern Rock Sengi energetically pinging around rocks at 1130 pm; so they are likely more active at night than is generally indicated.

The shed at RRR appears to be used as a night roost by Cape Serotine and Lesueur’s Wing-gland Bat.

Two probable but unconfirmed species are Cape Hare and Cape Rock Sengi. If anyone has definitive photo records then feel free to email me on that and/or any other comments; and I can update the post.

Paul Carter (paulcarter @ pacapix.com)

3 Comments
  1. kittykat23uk 4 months ago

    I was told one of my sightings was Cape hare, photos are in this album. Would welcome views though.. https://www.flickr.com/photos/kittykat23uk/albums/72157687274802771/with/23946586508/

    Good to know riverine rabbit are still present, I’d love to go back there sometime.

  2. Author
    Paul Carter 4 months ago

    I updated the post to include Cape Hare. The ochre-buff band between the white abdomen and greyish-brown sides is indicative in this area; whereas the Scrub hare does not have that ochre-buff band (see the Smithers field guide by Peter Apps)
    Paul Carter

Leave a reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

*


*

©2022 Jon Hall. www.mammalwatching.com | jon@mammalwatching.com | | | Privacy Policy

Log in with your credentials

or    

Forgot your details?

Create Account